Amanda Graham, MS, LPC, NCC

Amanda Graham, MS, LPC, NCC

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Amanda has been a member of Eagala since 2002, completed her Advanced Certification in 2009 and became a Mentor in 2010, presenting at several of Eagala’s national conferences. In 2007, Amanda co-founded the EAP program, Horses for Change, in Gunnison, Colorado, under the umbrella of The Center for Mental Health, a nonprofit, community behavioral health agency. During her mentoring process, she had the chance to work as both the ES and the MHP, an invaluable experience for learning to use the power of the horse in session. On the MH side, Amanda received her MS in Counseling in 2000 and is certified in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Mental Health First Aid (MHFA). On the ES side, she has lived with and learned from horses for over 20 years, and has studied natural horsemanship with Ray Hunt, Pat Parelli, Karen Scholl, and John Lyons. Amanda has a passion for animal welfare and was appointed by County Commissioners in North Carolina as a certified animal cruelty investigator. She served on the Board of Directors for the NC Horse Council and founded the Equine Welfare Committee for that organization. Amanda has practiced and taught Mindfulness meditation for many years and has developed “Mindful Leadership” and “Mindfulness in the Workplace” programs in her current role as a senior vice president at Alliance Behavioral Healthcare. She incorporates this practice into her Eagala work to increase awareness, acceptance, focus, and clarity. A lifelong learner, Amanda considers it a privilege to work with other Eagala professionals who are engaged in further growth and learning for themselves. She lives on her farm outside of Durham, North Carolina, with her husband and two horses, and supports Eagala as the Continuing Education Director.
 
"What I have come to learn over the years of working with the Eagala Model and all of its developments and refinements is the power of presence and curiosity and the intentional practice of really getting out of the way of the horses and people so they can do their work together. To me, my learning has been a settling of noise, in my own mind: letting go of my agendas and the chatter that is constant for all of us. The horses are so subtle in their work. And the people we serve respond to that, when we create a container than can hold them safely to explore. As I have worked in more corporate environments without the presence of horses, I have learned that the Eagala model skillsets can be used in many settings outside of the arena, in meetings and groups wherever good partnership and focus and curiosity are allowed to arise. It has become a way of life for me, and I enjoy being in the service of others as they explore their own journeys."